Bone Broth

Here are 10 great reasons to start making bone broth. 

1. Fights infections such as colds and flu. 
2. It heals a leaky gut. 
3. Reduces joint pain and inflammation. 
4. Produces gorgeous skin, hair and nails. 
5. Helps with bone formation, growth and repair. 
6. Homemade bone broth is cheaper and healthier than store bought.
7. Easy to make. 
8. Healthier than buying supplements. 
9. Fights inflammation. 
10. Promotes sleep and calms the mind. 

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Bone Broth

2lbs beef bones (100% grass fed if possible)

2 Tbs apple cider vinegar or lemon juice (to draw out the minerals)

Water, to cover

2 celery stalks, roughly chopped

2 carrots, roughly chopped

2 leeks (you can use the tops and bottoms for the stock and use the middle part for a soup)

5 cloves of garlic

Small bunch of parsley

4 inches of astragalus root (Immune building) (should find in health stores)

 

Method

1.       Preheat oven to 200 C. Place bones on sheet pan and roast until brown, approx. 40 minutes. This will increase the flavour of the stock. (This step can be omitted)

2.       Add bones to stock pot with the vinegar or lemon juice and enough water to cover the bones.

3.       Bring to a simmer, removing any scum that rises to the surface. Simmer very lightly for 8-45 hours. (the longer the better) you can even make 2 or 3 batches of stock out of the same bones, to get the most out of them.  Add more water when needed. If you have a slow cooker transfer to this after 3 hours and set on low setting.

4.       Add the rest of the ingredients in the last half hour of cooking

5.       Strain through a fine strainer.

6.       Cool completely before refrigerating.

7.       The broth will gel when sufficient gelatin is present. It will keep for 5 days in the fridge or it can be frozen for several months.

You can use lamb bones, fish bones and shrimp shells. Chicken can also be used, but does not need as much time simmering, 6-24 hours.

It can be enjoyed on its own, used to cook beans and grains, or of course, in a soup.

 

Recipe by Nicky Halliday

Adapted from Bauman College Staff